British scientists discover major treatment for bladder cancer

A significant breakthrough in 30 years for treating the advanced bladder cancer.

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London discovered that an antibody allows immune system to gather and eliminate cancer cells before they could spread.

A cancer immunotherapy medicine named MPDL3280A being developed by Roche, has been administered as part of first clinical trial keeping 68 people under observation where other treatments failed to cure.

After 12 weeks of treatment, more than half of the patients had seen their tumours shrink while two of them were completely cured.

Patients, whose tumours were using PD-L1, a camouflage layer to hide from the immune system, showed signs of recovery.

It is noted that one in ten patients responded to the experimental therapy even if PD-L1 was not present in the tumour.

In order to see that the trails progress quickly, USFDA has assigned ‘breakthrough’ designation status owing to the interest generated.

With around 5,000 deaths a year, bladder cancer is the seventh most common cancer in the UK.

Although poor outcomes are reported, Chemotherapy is the only option available for decades.

The new study has the potential to bring into existence an alternative and effective advanced bladder cancer treatment and is now being examined by European drug regulators.

To see that the experimental therapy is used in Europe, much larger randomised clinical trials are required .

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